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Exhibition of Keraca Visulceva in Macedonian Academy of Science and Arts (MANU)- First Academic Lady exhibits in Macedonia


(Makedonija Denes, 05.06.2003) - Academic Cvetan Grozdanov will open the retrospective –monograph exhibition of painter Keraca Visulceva in the art gallery of MANU. Due to the tragic Balkan traps of history, this is the first exhibition of the 93-year-old Visulceva in Macedonia. The exhibition is an attempt to integrate her civil and nurtured painting in our art history -
The exhibition, which will be opened in MANU on Thursday evening, is a gesture of respect towards the rich and significant work of this artist, who has been put in the tragic traps of the Balkan history, which played with her national, human and artistic identity. Visulceva was born in 1910 in Kostur area, but her family moved to Bulgaria during the Balkan wars. She graduated at the Sofia Fine Arts Academy, and lived and worked in Plovdiv for a long time. As an author with an untamed temperament, she showed numerous forms of civil disobedience in Bulgaria. The constant repeating that she is a Macedonian resulted in her exclusion from the Bulgarian Artists’ Association. She worked as a teacher in villages throughout Pirin Macedonia, “working” on the constant need to win her place of belonging in her own country and her own people.
Her dream became a reality, when she moved to Skopje in 1995, as a result of the assistance of numerous intellectuals, academics, ambassadors, art historians, and before all, former President Kiro Gligorov. She submitted all her legacy (around 400 drawings, oil and sculptures) to the state of Macedonia.
According to the exhibition curator Sonja Abadzieva, Visulceva is “the first academic lady in the modern Macedonian painting, who rhythmically followed the Macedonian painting doyens, but also those world class ones”. Abadzieva selected 76 artworks for the exhibition, mostly oil on canvass, which in the largest part have been conserved and put in the Museum of Macedonia.
“This noble effort of presenting the great authorship work of Visulceva to Macedonia is an attempt to include her in our culture, to which she will fully belong one day”, Abadzieva said. “Now is the time to begin with the research of the possibilities for integration of a civil and nurtured painting in our art history. Her long-standing abstinence from the Macedonian art stage and the differences in the lingual articulations of the painting problematic will present exciting moments for the future researchers and reviewers of this opus”.


 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

brzi - 2001